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Here Are Canon’s and Nikon’s Crazy DSLR Stockpiles at the 2018 Olympics

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If you want to see a picture of Canon and Nikon’s continued dominance in the world of sports photography, just take a look at the massive camera arsenals each company brought to the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea.

Canon and Nikon both have 60 tech reps from over 10 countries around the world on hand to provide photographers with assistance, including services such as cleaning, checking, and calibrating equipment, Shutterbug reports.

Canon’s Camera Arsenal

Canon says it has 1,359 different items on hand, including 205 cameras and 520 lenses. 100 of those cameras are 1D X Mark II DSLRs, which cost $5,500 each (so $550,000 worth of that model alone).

The camera technicians have 700 different spare parts on hand to make sure Canon photographers have perfectly functioning cameras.

Nikon’s Camera Arsenal

The Nikon arsenal contains the D5, D850, and a large selection of prime and zoom lenses. DPReview reports that while the exact number of Nikon cameras and lenses at the Games is confidential, the stockpile is worth about “several hundred luxury cars.” If each of those luxury car costs $40,000, then 400 of them would have a value of $16 million.

Nikon has begun publishing 2018 Olympics photos captured with its equipment on the Nikon Professional Services blog.

Back in 2016, we shared glimpses into the Canon and Nikon equipment rooms at the Rio Summer Olympics.

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JimB
1 day ago
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And I'd thought the camera equipment I saw on a boat trip to the Farne islands was amazing. Probably a quarter of a million cost in dollars or pounds .
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dianaschnuth
6 days ago
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Holy mare.
Toledo OH
schnuth
6 days ago
Dang, talk about being prepared!
mareino
7 days ago
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Especially impressive, because I can think of at least 4 Korean companies that make digital cameras.
Washington, District of Columbia

Robert Mueller just opened the door for treason charges against Donald Trump and his people

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The moment came and went in an instant. It’ll get lost in the shock and awe of today’s announcement that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has obtained grand jury indictments against thirteen Russian nationals for conspiring to rig the election in Donald Trump’s favor. But in the end, we may look back at two words from today as having been key in all this: cyber war. Why does that matter? Because in legal terms, they translate to another word: treason.

Today’s grand jury indictments against the Russians establish that Russian hacking was in fact an act of cyber war, according to an on-air MSNBC legal expert. Treason charges require that an act of war be involved. Up to now, the federal government has not attempted to clearly define what counts as an act of cyber war, meaning there’s little legal precedent on the matter. Today firmly establishes that the Russian hacking of the U.S. presidential election was indeed an act of cyber war against the United States.

This means that people involved with the Trump-Russia scandal can be charged with treason. We’ve already seen Trump campaign advisers Paul Manafort and Rick Gates be charged with Conspiracy Against the United States, the peacetime equivalent to treason charges. But if it can be demonstrated that Manafort and Gates knew the Russians were hacking the election even as they were committing their own related crimes with Russia, they can be charged with conspiracy to commit treason.

More importantly, if it can be demonstrated that Donald Trump knew about the Russian election hacking even as he played his own role in the Trump-Russia conspiracy, this means that Trump can be charged with treason. Today was yet another reminder that Robert Mueller has always been several steps ahead of us, and that we don’t know for sure what he’ll do next, or even what else he’s secretly done. But he does everything for a reason. Today he established that Trump-Russia was an act of cyber war against the United States. There’s only one reason for him to have done that.

The post Robert Mueller just opened the door for treason charges against Donald Trump and his people appeared first on Palmer Report.

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JimB
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‘Trump Inc.’ Podcast: Money Laundering and the Trump Taj Mahal

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Just months before Donald Trump announced his bid for president in 2015, federal regulators announced they were slapping one of his longtime Atlantic City casinos with a record-setting $10 million fine for lack of controls around money laundering.

The problems went back years. The penalty was actually the second record-setting fine for the Trump Taj Mahal involving money-laundering oversight.

What exactly did the Taj fail to do? Casino officials admitted to “willful and repeated” violations of the Bank Secrecy Act: As federal authorities put it in a settlement:

Trump Taj Mahal admitted that it failed to implement and maintain an effective AML [anti-money laundering] program; failed to report suspicious transactions; failed to properly file required currency transaction reports; and failed to keep appropriate records as required.

In this episode of “Trump, Inc.,” our podcast with WNYC, we dig into the now-bankrupt and shuttered Trump Taj Mahal, once one of the biggest and glitziest casinos in the world. It’s a story of chaotic operations, massive debt, and a tendency to treat rules as more like suggestions. Ring a bell?

Listen to the Podcast

Subscribe here to “Trump, Inc.” or wherever you get your podcasts.

And remember, we want to hear from you: We’re always eager for tips. We also want to hear your questions. What would you like to know about Trump’s businesses? What confuses you?

You can contact us via Signal, WhatsApp or voicemail at 347-244-2134. Here’s more about how you can contact us securely.

You can always email us at tips@trumpincpodcast.org.

And finally, you can use the postal service:

Trump Inc at ProPublica
155 Ave of the Americas, 13th Floor
New York, NY 10013

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JimB
1 day ago
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They've another story on job creation with the facts showing how trump falsely claimed pre-existing or non-existent jobs.
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Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble

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JimB
1 day ago
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Very sad but true. The difficulty of search, the single layer, the lack of consistency in adding or editing any feature strike chords. I'd add the plethora of notes from people with good intentions who can't or won't edit, that end up obscuring otherwise valid information.
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tante
3 days ago
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In-Depth analysis of the problems OpenStreetMap needs to address to stay relevant.

This is crucial: There needs to be open and free geo data.
Oldenburg/Germany

How the NRA Rewrote the Second Amendment

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Michael Waldman, writing for Politico in 2014:

From 1888, when law review articles first were indexed, through 1959, every single one on the Second Amendment concluded it did not guarantee an individual right to a gun. The first to argue otherwise, written by a William and Mary law student named Stuart R. Hays, appeared in 1960. He began by citing an article in the NRA’s American Rifleman magazine and argued that the amendment enforced a “right of revolution,” of which the Southern states availed themselves during what the author called “The War Between the States.”

At first, only a few articles echoed that view. Then, starting in the late 1970s, a squad of attorneys and professors began to churn out law review submissions, dozens of them, at a prodigious rate. Funds — much of them from the NRA — flowed freely. An essay contest, grants to write book reviews, the creation of “Academics for the Second Amendment,” all followed. In 2003, the NRA Foundation provided $1 million to endow the Patrick Henry professorship in constitutional law and the Second Amendment at George Mason University Law School.

This fusillade of scholarship and pseudo-scholarship insisted that the traditional view — shared by courts and historians — was wrong. There had been a colossal constitutional mistake. Two centuries of legal consensus, they argued, must be overturned.

We don’t need to repeal the 2nd Amendment — although I think we should, insofar as it is inexplicably ambiguously written and punctuated — we just need to flip the Supreme Court to interpret it as it had been from 1789 through 2008.

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JimB
1 day ago
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sirshannon
2 days ago
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I want to join a PAC for gun owners against the NRA.
sfrazer
2 days ago
Well, there’s always the GOA who thinks the NRA doesn’t go far enough. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_Owners_of_America

It’s about the thinking

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At some point in the past, programmers used to recommend drawing flowcharts before you start coding. Then they recommended creating CRC cards, or acting through how the turtle will behave, or writing failing tests, or getting the types to match up, or designing contracts, or writing proofs, but the point is that in each case they’re there for eliciting thought before the code gets laid down.

None of these things is mutually exclusive, none of these things is the one true way, but the fact that they all isolate some part of solving the problem from some part of coding the solution is the telling point. The problem is not having the correct type system or test coverage or diagram format, the problem is trying to work in two (or more) levels of abstraction – the problem domain and the computer – at the same time.

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JimB
1 day ago
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Not just computing. Law making, rule making : they both need to have a clear idea of the desired result AND the unintended consequences AND catching all input scenarios (aka gaming the system)
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